Increased serum IgG and IgA in overweight children relate to a less favourable metabolic phenotype

Increased serum IgG and IgA in overweight children relate to a less favourable metabolic phenotype

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Grup d'investigació: 

BACKGROUND:

The adaptive immune system has emerged as an unexpected modulator of insulin resistance. B lymphocytes accumulate in adipose tissue and produce pathogenic antibodies that cause insulin resistance.

OBJECTIVE:

We studied whether circulating immunoglobulins (IgGIgA and IgM) were related to metabolic risk markers in pre-pubertal children with and without overweight.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

Subjects were 270 asymptomatic pre-pubertal Caucasian children (145 lean, 125 overweight) recruited in a primary care setting. Assessments included serum IgGIgA and IgM concentrations (nephelometry), insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and fasting lipids (triacylglycerol and high-density lipoprotein [HDL]-cholesterol).

RESULTS:

Overweight children had higher IgG and IgA serum levels than lean children (P ≤ 0.01). Increasing serumIgG and IgA, but not IgM, were associated with a less favourable metabolic phenotype, consisting of higher HOMA-IR and triacylglycerol and lower HDL-cholesterol, particularly in obese children, in whom serum IgG and IgA were both independently associated with HOMA-IR (β = 0.308, P = 0.017, r2  = 9.5% and β = 0.361, P = 0.005, r2  = 13.0%, respectively) and triacylglycerol (β = 0.343, P = 0.006, r2  = 11.1% and β = 0.354, P = 0.003, r2  = 12.2%, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:

Increased circulating IgG and IgA in overweight children are associated with a less favourablemetabolic phenotype, particularly in obese children. These results suggest a relationship between adaptive immunity and insulin resistance in childhood obesity.

Media title: 
Pediatric Obesity